//Soviet Cameras
There's a certain charm to old Soviet cameras. They're typically built like tanks with very dense metal and they tend to weigh quite a bit. Within my collection, I own two very different Soviet era cameras.
 
The automatic 'point and shoot' Lomo LC-A - originally produced in the mid-eighties, spurred an entire lo-fi 'Lomography' movement within the past decade and contributed towards the resurgence of film photography with it's compact design and unique, aesthetically pleasing photographic characteristics.
 
As well as the Lomo, I also own a very heavy, very study fully manual, fully mechanical Zenit 3M. This Zenit happens to be a special edition 'Soviet anniversary' edition where 1917-1967 is marked in red writing on the top. Hilarious.
The Zenit is a very basic SLR camera with shutter speed options of bulb, 30, 60, 125, 250 and 500ths of a second. You are left to determine the shutter speed and aperture setting based on the environment lighting and ISO speed rating of the film. 
 
Below is a mixture of photos taken on the Lomo LC-A and Zenit 3M with Fujichrome Sensia 200,  Ferrania Solaris FG Plus 100 ISO and Fujicolor 100 35mm film.
 
 
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